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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1297658, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1297658
Review Article

Selenium and Thyroid Disease: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
2Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to Miguel Melo; tp.moc.evil@olemleugimj

Received 14 August 2016; Revised 31 October 2016; Accepted 17 November 2016; Published 31 January 2017

Academic Editor: Marek Bolanowski

Copyright © 2017 Mara Ventura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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