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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1613657, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1613657
Research Article

Metabolic Syndrome in People Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: An Assessment of the Prevalence and the Agreement between Diagnostic Criteria

1Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town 7505, South Africa
2Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7935, South Africa
3United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Mildmay Uganda, P.O. Box 24985, Lweza, Uganda
4Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness Science, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town 7535, South Africa
5Global Evaluation Science, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 3X4

Correspondence should be addressed to Kim Anh Nguyen; az.ca.crm@neyugn.mik

Received 20 September 2016; Accepted 1 February 2017; Published 14 March 2017

Academic Editor: Andrea Tura

Copyright © 2017 Kim Anh Nguyen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. We determined metabolic syndrome (MetS) prevalence and assessed the agreement between different diagnostic criteria in HIV-infected South Africans. Method. A random sample included 748 HIV-infected adult patients (79% women) across 17 HIV healthcare facilities in the Western Cape Province. MetS was defined using the Joint Interim Statement (JIS 2009), International Diabetes Federation (IDF 2005), and Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII 2005) criteria. Results. Median values were 38 years (age), 5 years (diagnosed HIV duration), and 392 cells/mm3 (CD4 count), and 93% of the participants were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). MetS prevalence was 28.2% (95%CI: 25–31.4), 26.5% (23.3–29.6), and 24.1% (21–27.1) by the JIS, IDF, and ATPIII 2005 criteria, respectively. Prevalence was always higher in women than in men (all ), in participants with longer duration of diagnosed HIV (all ), and in ART users not receiving 1st-line regimens (all ). The agreement among the three criteria was very good overall and in most subgroups (all ). Conclusions. The three most popular diagnostic criteria yielded similarly high MetS prevalence in this relatively young population receiving care for HIV infection. Very good levels of agreement between criteria are unaffected by some HIV-specific features highlighting the likely comparable diagnostic utility of those criteria in routine HIV care settings.