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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2017, Article ID 5753039, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5753039
Clinical Study

Benefits of Levothyroxine Replacement Therapy on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Subclinical Hypothyroidism Patients

Lu Liu,1,2,3 Yong Yu,4 Meng Zhao,1,2,3 Dongmei Zheng,1,2,3 Xu Zhang,1,2,3 Qingbo Guan,1,2,3 Chao Xu,1,2,3 Ling Gao,2,3,5 Jiajun Zhao,1,2,3 and Haiqing Zhang1,2,3

1Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250021, China
2Shandong Clinical Medical Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jinan, Shandong 250021, China
3Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shandong Academy of Clinical Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250021, China
4Department of Sonography, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250021, China
5Scientific Center, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250021, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Haiqing Zhang; moc.361@6757gnahzgniqiah

Received 7 September 2016; Revised 22 November 2016; Accepted 15 December 2016; Published 4 April 2017

Academic Editor: Paul M. Yen

Copyright © 2017 Lu Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the effect of levothyroxine (LT4) replacement therapy on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) patients. Methods. This study was a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial and involved 33 significant and 330 mild SCH patients. All of the significant SCH patients received LT4 supplement. The mild SCH patients were grouped as LT4 treated or not. After 15 months of follow-up, prevalence of NAFLD in each group was reevaluated. Subgroup analysis was conducted in mild SCH patients with dyslipidemia. Results. After treatment with LT4, the prevalence of NAFLD in significant SCH patients reduced from 48.5% to 24.2% (). In mild SCH patients, prevalence of NAFLD and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was not significantly affected by LT4 supplementation. Nonetheless, mild SCH patients with dyslipidemia who received LT4 treatment experienced decreases in the prevalence of NAFLD and serum ALT levels ( for both). In contrast, these parameters remained comparably stable in patients who were not treated. Conclusion. LT4 supplementation has benefits on NAFLD in significant SCH patients or mild SCH patients with dyslipidemia. For NAFLD patients with SCH, appropriate supplementation of LT4 may be an effective means of controlling NAFLD. The original trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01848171).