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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2017, Article ID 8234502, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8234502
Research Article

Melatonin in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Analysis Using Modern Mathematical Modeling Methods

1Department of Pediatric Neurology, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
2Department of Medical Physics, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Justyna Paprocka; lp.airetni@akcorpap.anytsuj

Received 30 August 2016; Revised 23 January 2017; Accepted 9 March 2017; Published 26 April 2017

Academic Editor: Darío Acuña-Castroviejo

Copyright © 2017 Justyna Paprocka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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