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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 3786038, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3786038
Review Article

Adaptive Modifications of Maternal Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity during Lactation and Salsolinol as a New Player in this Phenomenon

Department of Animal Physiology, The Kielanowski Institute of Animal Physiology and Nutrition Polish Academy of Sciences, Instytucka 3, 05-110 Jablonna, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Tomasz Misztal; lp.nap.zzfi@latzsim.t

Received 30 August 2017; Accepted 21 March 2018; Published 10 April 2018

Academic Editor: Maria L. Dufau

Copyright © 2018 Malgorzata Hasiec and Tomasz Misztal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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