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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2018, Article ID 7515767, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7515767
Review Article

Potential Crosstalk between Fructose and Melatonin: A New Role of Melatonin—Inhibiting the Metabolic Effects of Fructose

Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Department of Basic Sciences, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Campus Fernando May, Chillán, Chile

Correspondence should be addressed to Francisco J. Valenzuela-Melgarejo; lc.oiboibu@aleuznelavf

Received 12 March 2018; Revised 22 May 2018; Accepted 19 June 2018; Published 1 August 2018

Academic Editor: Darío Acuña-Castroviejo

Copyright © 2018 Francisco J. Valenzuela-Melgarejo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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