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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 419482, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/419482
Research Article

Seed Bank Variation under Contrasting Site Quality Conditions in Mixed Oak Forests of Southeastern Ohio, USA

1Department of Biology, Radford University, Radford, P.O. Box 6931, VA 24142, USA
2Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA

Received 31 August 2009; Accepted 3 February 2010

Academic Editor: Marc D. Abrams

Copyright © 2010 Christine J. Small and Brian C. McCarthy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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