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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 329836, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/329836
Research Article

Does Proximity to Wetland Shrubland Increase the Habitat Value for Shrubland Birds of Small Patches of Upland Shrubland in the Northeastern United States?

1Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, 1 Greenhouse Road, Kingston, RI 02881, USA
2National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, US Environmental Protection Agency, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI 02992, USA

Received 13 November 2013; Revised 13 January 2014; Accepted 14 January 2014; Published 20 February 2014

Academic Editor: Kihachiro Kikuzawa

Copyright © 2014 Bill Buffum and Richard A. McKinney. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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