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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 715796, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/715796
Review Article

Remote Sensing of Aboveground Biomass in Tropical Secondary Forests: A Review

1Department of Ecology, Institute of Biosciences, University of São Paulo, 05508-090 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Sustainability Science Program, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

Received 3 December 2013; Revised 1 February 2014; Accepted 12 February 2014; Published 23 March 2014

Academic Editor: Guy R. Larocque

Copyright © 2014 J. M. Barbosa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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