Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 920964, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/920964
Research Article

The Cost of Managing Forest Carbon under REDD+ Initiatives: A Case of Kolo Hills Forests in Kondoa District, Dodoma, Tanzania

1Forest Industries Training Institute, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, P.O. Box 1925, Moshi, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
2Department of Forest Engineering, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P.O. Box 3012, Morogoro, Tanzania
3Department of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Ås, Norway

Received 7 February 2014; Revised 15 July 2014; Accepted 15 July 2014; Published 20 August 2014

Academic Editor: Sunil Nautiyal

Copyright © 2014 Kabura John et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Countries considering participating in a REDD+ mechanism need information on what it would cost them to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. This study was conducted to estimate the cost of managing forest carbon under REDD+ initiatives in Kolo Hills Forest, Kondoa, Tanzania. Socioeconomic and biophysical information was collected through structured questionnaires, focus group discussions, and forest inventory, respectively. Results show that the community participated in managing the forest by undertaking a range of activities such as tree planting, patrolling, and fire protection. The estimated total cost was USD 418,349.38 while the average cost was USD 79.06/ha. The average carbon stored was 19.75 tC ha−1, which is equivalent to 72.48 tCO2 ha−1. Costs incurred by managing the forest in relation to tCO2 stored were USD 1.0485 tCO2 e−1ha−1. The project was found to be economically feasible at 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% discount rates with NPVs of USD 107,102,331.83, USD 33,986,255.86, USD 10,312,945, and USD 1,245,905.11, respectively. The internal rate of return was 21.21% which is much higher than the World Bank rate of 15.8% and the Tanzania rate of 14.8%. We therefore conclude that the decision to undertake this REDD+ project was worthwhile and should be favoured against the “do nothing” alternative.