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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5847068, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5847068
Research Article

Livelihoods and Welfare Impacts of Forest Comanagement

1School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2DG, UK
2Institute of Advanced Study of Sustainability, United Nations University, No. 53-70, Jingumae 5-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8925, Japan
3Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2DG, UK

Received 25 April 2016; Accepted 14 August 2016

Academic Editor: Ilan Vertinsky

Copyright © 2016 Linda Chinangwa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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