Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 1249140, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1249140
Research Article

The Impact of Drought and Vascular-Inhabiting Pathogen Invasion in Pinus taeda Health

1Forest Health Dynamics Laboratory, 602 Duncan Drive, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5418, USA
2Southern Forest Nursery Management Cooperative, Forest Health Dynamics Laboratory, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, 602 Duncan Drive, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5418, USA
3Forest Health Cooperative, Forest Health Dynamics Laboratory, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, 602 Duncan Drive, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5418, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Pratima Devkota; ude.usm@patokved

Received 11 December 2017; Revised 4 May 2018; Accepted 14 June 2018; Published 3 July 2018

Academic Editor: Kihachiro Kikuzawa

Copyright © 2018 Pratima Devkota et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. D. Adams, M. J. Germino, D. D. Breshears et al., “Nonstructural leaf carbohydrate dynamics of Pinus edulis during drought-induced tree mortality reveal role for carbon metabolism in mortality mechanism,” New Phytologist, vol. 197, no. 4, pp. 1142–1151, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. M. Cailleret, M. Nourtier, A. Amm, M. Durand-Gillmann, and H. Davi, “Drought-induced decline and mortality of silver fir differ among three sites in Southern France,” Annals of Forest Science, vol. 71, no. 6, pp. 643–657, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J. Carnicer, M. Coll, M. Ninyerola, X. Pons, G. Sánchez, and J. Peñuelas, “Widespread crown condition decline, food web disruption, and amplified tree mortality with increased climate change-type drought,” Proceedings of the National Acadamy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 108, no. 4, pp. 1474–1478, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. P. J. Van Mantgem, N. L. Stephenson, J. C. Byrne et al., “Widespread increase of tree mortality rates in the Western United States,” Science, vol. 323, no. 5913, pp. 521–524, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. R. J. Klos, G. G. Wang, W. L. Bauerle, and J. R. Rieck, “Drought impact on forest growth and mortality in the southeast USA: An analysis using Forest Health and Monitoring data,” Ecological Applications, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 699–708, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. H. Wang, R. Fu, A. Kumar, and W. Li, “Intensification of summer rainfall variability in the southeastern United States during recent decades,” Journal of Hydrometeorology, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 1007–1018, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. IPCC, Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2013.
  8. C. Peng, Z. Ma, X. Lei et al., “A drought-induced pervasive increase in tree mortality across Canada's boreal forests,” Nature Climate Change, vol. 1, no. 9, pp. 467–471, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. N. G. McDowell, D. J. Beerling, D. D. Breshears, R. A. Fisher, K. F. Raffa, and M. Stitt, “The interdependence of mechanisms underlying climate-driven vegetation mortality,” Trends in Ecology & Evolution, vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 523–532, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. Lindberg and M. Johansson, “Resistance of Picea abies seedlings to infection by Heterobasidion annosum in relation to drought stress,” Forest Pathology, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 115–124, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. S. Turtola, A.-M. Manninen, R. Rikala, and P. Kainulainen, “Drought stress alters the concentration of wood terpenoids in Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings,” Journal of Chemical Ecology, vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 1981–1995, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. K. F. Raffa, B. H. Aukema, B. J. Bentz et al., “Cross-scale drivers of natural disturbances prone to anthropogenic amplification: The dynamics of bark beetle eruptions,” Bioscience, vol. 58, no. 6, pp. 501–517, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. Oliva, J. Stenlid, and J. Martínez-Vilalta, “The effect of fungal pathogens on the water and carbon economy of trees: Implications for drought-induced mortality,” New Phytologist, vol. 203, no. 4, pp. 1028–1035, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. K. A. Yadeta and B. P. H. J. Thomma, “The xylem as battleground for plant hosts and vascular wilt pathogens,” Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 4, article 97, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. Singh, D. Anderson, and L. G. Eckhardt, “Variation in resistance of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) families against Leptographium and Grosmannia root fungi,” Forest Pathology, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 293–298, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. G. Matusick and L. G. Eckhardt, “The pathogenicity and virulence of four Ophiostomatoid fungi on young Longleaf pine trees,” Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 170–176, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. N. G. Mcdowell, M. G. Ryan, M. J. B. Zeppel, and D. T. Tissue, “Feature: Improving our knowledge of drought-induced forest mortality through experiments, observations, and modeling,” New Phytologist, vol. 200, no. 2, pp. 289–293, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Noormets, M. J. Gavazzi, S. G. McNulty et al., “Response of carbon fluxes to drought in a coastal plain loblolly pine forest,” GCB Bioenergy, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 272–287, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. A. Maggard, R. Will, D. Wilson, and C. Meek, “Response of mid-rotation loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) physiology and productivity to sustained, moderate drought on the western edge of the range,” Forests, vol. 7, no. 9, p. 203, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  20. G. Matusick, L. G. Eckhardt, and S. A. Enebak, “Virulence of Leptographium serpens on longleaf pine seedlings under varying soil moisture regimes,” Plant Disease, vol. 92, no. 11, pp. 1574–1576, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. Chieppa, L. Eckhardt, and A. Chappelka, “Simulated summer rainfall variability effects on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) seedling physiology and susceptibility to root-infecting ophiostomatoid fungi,” Forests, vol. 8, no. 4, p. 104, 2017. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. R. J. Nevill, W. D. Kelley, N. J. Hess, and T. J. Perry, “Pathogenicity to loblolly pines of fungi recovered from trees attacked by southern pine beetles,” Southern Journal of Applied Forestry, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 78–83, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  23. L. G. Eckhardt, A. M. Weber, R. D. Menard, J. P. Jones, and N. J. Hess, “Insect-fungal complex associated with loblolly pine decline in central Alabama,” Forest Science, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 84–92, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. W. J. Otrosina, N. J. Hess, S. J. Zarnoch, T. J. Perry, and J. P. Jones, “Blue-stain fungi associated with roots of southern pine trees attacked by the Southern Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis,” Plant Disease, vol. 81, no. 8, pp. 942–945, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. Salle, H. Ye, A. Yart, and F. Lieutier, “Seasonal water stress and the resistance of Pinus yunnanensis to a bark-beetle-associated fungus,” Tree Physiology, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 679–687, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. E. Christiansen and A. M. Glosli, “Mild drought enhances the resistance of Norway spruce to a bark beetle-transmitted blue-stain fungus,” Tech. Rep., United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Asheville, NC, USA, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  27. F. S. Carevic, J. Delatorre-Herrera, and J. Delatorre-Castillo, “Inter- and intrapopulation variation in the response of tree seedlings to drought: physiological adjustments based on geographical origin, water supply and species,” AoB Plants, vol. 9, no. 5, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  28. P. Devkota, R. L. Nadel, and L. G. Eckhardt, “Intraspecies variation of mature Pinus taeda in response to root-infecting ophiostomatoid fungi,” Forest Pathology, Article ID e12415, 2018. View at Google Scholar
  29. J. T. Blodgett, E. L. Kruger, and G. R. Stanosz, “Sphaeropsis sapinea and water stress in a red pine plantation in Central Wisconsin,” Journal of Phytopathology, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 429–434, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. D. L. Maxwell, E. L. Kruger, and G. R. Stanosz, “Effects of water stress on colonization of poplar stems and excised leaf disks by Septoria musiva,” Journal of Phytopathology, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 381–388, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. E. C. Lahr and P. Krokene, “Conifer stored resources and resistance to a fungus associated with the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 8, Article ID e72405, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. M. T. Tyree and J. S. Sperry, “Vulnerability of xylem to cavitation and embolism,” Annual Review of Plant Biology, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 19–36, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. J. Chieppa, A. Chappelka, and L. Eckhardt, “Effects of tropospheric ozone on loblolly pine seedlings inoculated with root infecting ophiostomatoid fungi,” Environmental Pollution, vol. 207, pp. 130–137, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. A. Hammerbacher, A. Schmidt, N. Wadke et al., “A common fungal associate of the spruce bark beetle metabolizes the stilbene defenses of Norway spruce,” Plant Physiology, vol. 162, no. 3, pp. 1324–1336, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. M. H. Zimmermann, Xylem Structure and the Ascent of Sap, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany, 1983.
  36. G. Joseph, R. G. Kelsey, and W. G. Thies, “Hydraulic conductivity in roots of ponderosa pine infected with black-stain (Leptographium wageneri) or annosus (Heterobasidion annosum) root disease,” Tree Physiology, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 333–339, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. L. Croisé, F. Lieutier, H. Cochard, and E. Dreyer, “Effects of drought stress and high density stem inoculations with Leptographium wingfieldii on hydraulic properties of young Scots pine trees,” Tree Physiology, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 427–436, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. Meier, L. F. Grand, M. M. Schoeneberger, R. A. Reinert, and R. I. Bruck, “Growth, ectomycorrhizae and nonstructural carbohydrates of loblolly pine seedlings exposed to ozone and soil water deficit,” Environmental Pollution, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 11–27, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. T. J. Tschaplinski, R. J. Norby, and S. D. Wullschleger, “Responses of loblolly pine seedlings to elevated CO2 and fluctuating water supply,” Tree Physiology, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 283–296, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. J. R. Seiler and J. D. Johnson, “Physiological and morphological responses of three half-sib families of Loblolly pine to water-stress conditioning,” Forest Science, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 487–495, 1988. View at Google Scholar
  41. G. Niu, D. S. Rodriguez, and W. Mackay, “Growth and physiological responses to drought stress in four oleander clones,” Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, vol. 133, no. 2, pp. 188–196, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. D. Mantovani, M. Veste, and D. Freese, “Effects of drought frequency on growth performance and transpiration of young black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.),” Journal of Forestry Research, vol. 2014, Article ID 821891, 11 pages, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  43. B. M. Cregg, “Carbon allocation, gas exchange, and needle morphology of Pinus ponderosa genotypes known to differ in growth and survival under imposed drought,” Tree Physiology, vol. 14, no. 7-9, pp. 883–898, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus