International Journal of Genomics
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Acceptance rate27%
Submission to final decision83 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore2.030
Impact Factor2.303
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Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Molecular Defensive Mechanism of Arachis hypogaea in Response to Salt Stress

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Genomics publishes papers in all areas of genome-scale analysis, including bioinformatics, clinical and disease genomics, epigenomics, evolutionary and functional genomics, genome engineering, and synthetic genomics.

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Chief Editor, Professor Nislow, is currently based at the University of British Columbia as a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Translational Genomics, with a background in yeast genetics and genomics.

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Research Article

Reevaluating the Mutation Classification in Genetic Studies of Bradycardia Using ACMG/AMP Variant Classification Framework

Purpose. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become more accessible, leading to an increasing number of genetic studies of familial bradycardia being reported. However, most of the variants lack full evaluation. The relationship between genetic factors and bradycardia should be summarized and reevaluated. Methods. We summarized genetic studies published in the PubMed database from 2008/1/1 to 2019/9/1 and used the ACMG/AMP classification framework to analyze related sequence variants. Results. We identified 88 articles, 99 sequence variants, and 34 genes after searching the PubMed database and classified ABCC9, ACTN2, CACNA1C, DES, HCN4, KCNQ1, KCNH2, LMNA, MECP2, LAMP2, NPPA, SCN5A, and TRPM4 as high-priority genes causing familial bradycardia. Most mutated genes have been reported as having multiple clinical manifestations. Conclusions. For patients with familial CCD, 13 high-priority genes are recommended for evaluation. For genetic studies, variants should be carefully evaluated using the ACMG/AMP variant classification framework before publication.

Research Article

Comparative Genomics of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 8 Reveals the Importance of Prophages in the Genetic Variability of the Species

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. Currently, there are 18 different serotypes; the serotype 8 is the most widely distributed in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, and southeastern Brazil. In this study, genomes of seven A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 8 clinical isolates were compared to the other genomes of twelve serotypes. The analyses of serotype 8 genomes resulted in a set of 2352 protein-coding sequences. Of these sequences, 76.6% are present in all serotypes, 18.5% are shared with some serotypes, and 4.9% were differential. This differential portion was characterized as a series of hypothetical and regulatory protein sequences: mobile element sequence. Synteny analysis demonstrated possible events of gene recombination and acquisition by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in this species. A total of 30 sequences related to prophages were identified in the genomes. These sequences represented 0.3 to 3.5% of the genome of the strains analyzed, and 16 of them contained complete prophages. Similarity analysis between complete prophage sequences evidenced a possible HGT with species belonging to the family Pasteurellaceae. Thus, mobile genetic elements, such as prophages, are important components of the differential portion of the A. pleuropneumoniae genome and demonstrate a central role in the evolution of the species. This study represents the first study done to understand the genome of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 8.

Research Article

Streptococcus halichoeri: Comparative Genomics of an Emerging Pathogen

Streptococcus halichoeri is an emerging pathogen with a variety of host species and zoonotic potential. It has been isolated from grey seals and other marine mammals as well as from human infections. Beginning in 2010, two concurrent epidemics were identified in Finland, in fur animals and domestic dogs, respectively. The fur animals suffered from a new disease fur animal epidemic necrotic pyoderma (FENP) and the dogs presented with ear infections with poor treatment response. S. halichoeri was isolated in both studies, albeit among other pathogens, indicating a possible role in the disease etiologies. The aim was to find a possible common origin of the fur animal and dog isolates and study the virulence factors to assess pathogenic potential. Isolates from seal, human, dogs, and fur animals were obtained for comparison. The whole genomes were sequenced from 20 different strains using the Illumina MiSeq platform and annotated using an automatic annotation pipeline RAST. The core and pangenomes were formed by comparing the genomes against each other in an all-against-all comparison. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the genes of the core genome. Virulence factors were assessed using the Virulence Factor Database (VFDB) concentrating on the previously confirmed streptococcal factors. A core genome was formed which encompassed approximately half of the genes in Streptococcus halichoeri. The resulting core was nearly saturated and would not change significantly by adding more genomes. The remaining genes formed the pangenome which was highly variable and would still evolve after additional genomes. The results highlight the great adaptability of this bacterium possibly explaining the ease at which it switches hosts and environments. Virulence factors were also analyzed and were found primarily in the core genome. They represented many classes and functions, but the largest single category was adhesins which again supports the marine origin of this species.

Research Article

Downregulation of miR-1826 Indicates a Poor Prognosis for Osteosarcoma Patients and Regulates Tumor Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion

Background. Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most frequent bone tumor with high metastasis. This study is aimed at assessing the expression and prognostic significance of microRNA-1826 (miR-1826) in OS patients, as well as its biological function in tumor progression. Methods. Quantitative Real-Time PCR was employed to measure the expression of miR-1826 in OS tissues and cell lines. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression model were used to evaluate the prognostic value of miR-1826. CCK-8 and Transwell assay were conducted to investigate the effect of miR-1826 on OS cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Results. miR-1826 expression was downregulated in OS tissues and cell lines and associated with OS patients’ clinical stage and distant metastasis. Low levels of miR-1826 were related with shorter survival time and determined as an independent prognostic indicator for the overall survival of OS patients. The overexpression of miR-1826 in OS cells led to inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Conclusion. The decreased expression of miR-1826 predicts a poor prognosis in OS patients, and its overexpression inhibits OS cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. This newly identified miR-1826 provides a novel sight into the pathogenesis of OS and offers a candidate prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for OS treatment.

Research Article

Exceptional Enlargement of the Mitochondrial Genome Results from Distinct Causes in Different Rain Frogs (Anura: Brevicipitidae: Breviceps)

The mitochondrial (mt) genome of the bushveld rain frog (Breviceps adspersus, Brevicipitidae, Afrobatrachia) is the largest (28.8 kbp) among the vertebrates investigated to date. The major cause of genome size enlargement in this species is the duplication of multiple genomic regions. To investigate the evolutionary lineage, timing, and process of mt genome enlargement, we sequenced the complete mtDNAs of two congeneric rain frogs, B. mossambicus and B. poweri. The mt genomic organization, gene content, and gene arrangements of these two rain frogs are very similar to each other but differ from those of B. adspersus. The B. mossambicus mt genome (22.5 kbp) does not differ significantly from that of most other afrobatrachians. In contrast, the B. poweri mtDNA (28.1 kbp) is considerably larger: currently the second largest among vertebrates, after B. adspersus. The main causes of genome enlargement differ among Breviceps species. Unusual elongation (12.5 kbp) of the control region (CR), a single major noncoding region of the vertebrate mt genome, is responsible for the extremely large mt genome in B. poweri. Based on the current Breviceps phylogeny and estimated divergence age, it can be concluded that the genome enlargements occurred independently in each species lineage within relatively short periods. Furthermore, a high nucleotide substitution rate and relaxation of selective pressures, which are considered to be involved in changes in genome size, were also detected in afrobatrachian lineages. Our results suggest that these factors were not direct causes but may have indirectly affected mt genome enlargements in Breviceps.

Research Article

Effects of Inbreeding on Genetic Characteristic, Growth, Survival Rates, and Immune Responses of a New Inbred Line of Exopalaemon carinicauda

The Exopalaemon carinicauda could be a useful crustacean laboratory animal in many research fields. We newly established an inbred line of Exopalaemon carinicauda named EC4 inbred line by brother×sister mating and keeping to 11 generation. Trends in heterozygosity in the process of producing EC4 inbred line were examined through the characterization of polymorphisms based on gene frequencies of SNP and EST-SSR loci. The results demonstrated that the number of alleles (), observed heterozygosity (Ho), expected heterozygosity (He), and polymorphism information content (PIC) gradually decreased with the increase of inbreeding generations. The genetic detection results indicated that 9 (29.03%, 9/31) of the SNP loci and 15 (32.61%, 15/46) of the EST-SSR loci were homozygous in 11 generation of EC4 inbred line. The variation of the growth-related traits, the immune responses, and antioxidant status were described in experimental full-sibling inbred populations of E. carinicauda at five levels of inbreeding coefficient (, , , , ) under controlled laboratory conditions. The body weight, body length, and survival rate in EC4 inbred line of all generations were less than the control population. Inbreeding affected the antibacterial activity, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) which decreased at the eleventh generation of EC4 inbred line. This study demonstrated that inbreeding had a negative effect on the economic traits and immune response, but our inbred line was established successfully until 11 and confirmed by genetic detection using SNP and EST-SSR loci.

International Journal of Genomics
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate27%
Submission to final decision83 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore2.030
Impact Factor2.303
 Submit