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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2009, Article ID 406421, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/406421
Research Article

An Exon-Based Comparative Variant Analysis Pipeline to Study the Scale and Role of Frameshift and Nonsense Mutation in the Human-Chimpanzee Divergence

Department of Biological Science and Department of Computer Science, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725, USA

Received 31 May 2009; Revised 14 July 2009; Accepted 18 July 2009

Academic Editor: Antoine Danchin

Copyright © 2009 GongXin Yu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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