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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012, Article ID 134839, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/134839
Review Article

Diversity of Eukaryotic Translational Initiation Factor eIF4E in Protists

1Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, 701 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA
2Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, 647 Contees Wharf Road, Edgewater, MD 21037, USA
3BridgePath Scientific, 4841 International Boulevard, Suite 105, Frederick, MD 21703, USA

Received 26 January 2012; Accepted 9 April 2012

Academic Editor: Thomas Preiss

Copyright © 2012 Rosemary Jagus et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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