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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 256848, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/256848
Review Article

On the Diversification of the Translation Apparatus across Eukaryotes

1Division of Basic Research, National Institute for Cancer (INCan), Avenida San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14080 Mexico City, Mexico
2Centre for Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Life Sciences Building (B85), Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
3Genome Biology Department, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Building 131, Garran Road, Acton, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
4Goodman Cancer Centre and Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 1160 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3
5Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A1

Received 11 December 2011; Accepted 7 March 2012

Academic Editor: Brian Wigdahl

Copyright © 2012 Greco Hernández et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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