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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012, Article ID 287852, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/287852
Review Article

Conservation of the RNA Transport Machineries and Their Coupling to Translation Control across Eukaryotes

Institute of Cell Biology, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 4, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

Received 28 December 2011; Accepted 9 February 2012

Academic Editor: Greco Hernández

Copyright © 2012 Paula Vazquez-Pianzola and Beat Suter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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