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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2013, Article ID 269191, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/269191
Research Article

De Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Three Capra hircus Skin Types during Anagen of the Hair Growth Cycle

The Key Laboratory of Mammalian Reproductive Biology and Biotechnology of the Ministry of Education, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region 010021, China

Received 27 December 2012; Accepted 3 April 2013

Academic Editor: Soraya E. Gutierrez

Copyright © 2013 Teng Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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