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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2013, Article ID 542139, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/542139
Research Article

Extensive Differences in Antifungal Immune Response in Two Drosophila Species Revealed by Comparative Transcriptome Analysis

1Department of Biological Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan
2Research Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan

Received 4 June 2013; Accepted 3 August 2013

Academic Editor: Henry Heng

Copyright © 2013 Yosuke Seto and Koichiro Tamura. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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