Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 381501, 7 pages
Research Article

Identification of Salt-Stress-Induced Genes from the RNA-Seq Data of Reaumuria trigyna Using Differential-Display Reverse Transcription PCR

1Key Laboratory of Herbage & Endemic Crop Biotechnology and College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
2School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia

Received 5 August 2014; Revised 27 October 2014; Accepted 10 November 2014; Published 26 November 2014

Academic Editor: Qu Zhang

Copyright © 2014 Zhen-hua Dang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been used to generate huge amounts of sequencing data from many organisms. However, the correct choice of candidate genes and prevention of false-positive results computed from digital gene expression (DGE) of RNA-seq data are vital when using these genetic resources. We indirectly identified 18 salt-stress-induced Reaumuria trigyna transcripts from the transcriptome sequencing data using differential-display reverse transcription PCR (DDRT-PCR) combined with local BLAST searches. Highly consistent with the DGE results, the quantitative real-time PCR expression patterns of these transcripts showed strong upregulation by salt stress, suggesting that these genes may play important roles in R. trigyna’s survival under high-salt environments. The method presented here successfully identified responsive genes from the massive amount of RNA-seq data. Thus, we suggest that DDRT-PCR could be employed to mine NGS data in a wide range of applications in transcriptomic studies. In addition, the genes identified in the present study are promising candidates for further elucidation of the salt tolerance mechanisms in R. trigyna.