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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2015, Article ID 238704, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/238704
Research Article

Quantitative Shotgun Proteomics Analysis of Rice Anther Proteins after Exposure to High Temperature

1Department of Applied Bioscience, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Republic of Korea
2Department of Plant Bioscience, Pusan National University, Milyang 627-706, Republic of Korea

Received 9 September 2015; Revised 17 October 2015; Accepted 18 October 2015

Academic Editor: Jinfa Zhang

Copyright © 2015 Mijeong Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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