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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2015, Article ID 395753, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/395753
Review Article

RNA Degradation in Staphylococcus aureus: Diversity of Ribonucleases and Their Impact

Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell (I2BC), CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91400 Orsay, France

Received 6 January 2015; Accepted 4 March 2015

Academic Editor: Martine A. Collart

Copyright © 2015 Rémy A. Bonnin and Philippe Bouloc. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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