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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 563482, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/563482
Research Article

RECORD: Reference-Assisted Genome Assembly for Closely Related Genomes

Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics (MIM), University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland

Received 18 March 2015; Revised 27 May 2015; Accepted 31 May 2015

Academic Editor: Chun-Yuan Lin

Copyright © 2015 Krisztian Buza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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