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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017, Article ID 5935380, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5935380
Research Article

Comparative Genomic In Situ Hybridization and the Possible Role of Retroelements in the Karyotypic Evolution of Three Akodontini Species

1Laboratório de Citogenômica Evolutiva, Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627-Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Laboratório de Ecologia e Conservação, Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627-Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Naiara Pereira Araújo; rb.moc.oohay@ojuaraparaian, Gustavo Campos Silva Kuhn; moc.liamg@nhuk.sc.otug, and Marta Svartman; rb.gmfu.bci@mnamtravs

Received 27 December 2016; Revised 14 March 2017; Accepted 3 May 2017; Published 16 August 2017

Academic Editor: Elena Pasyukova

Copyright © 2017 Naiara Pereira Araújo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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