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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017, Article ID 6202567, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6202567
Research Article

Common Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Shared by Histone Genes

Department of Bioinformatics and Life Science, Soongsil University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Chaeyoung Lee; rk.ca.uss@eelc

Received 29 May 2017; Revised 26 July 2017; Accepted 2 August 2017; Published 27 August 2017

Academic Editor: Marco Gerdol

Copyright © 2017 Hanseol Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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