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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017, Article ID 6923849, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6923849
Research Article

Transcriptome-Based Modeling Reveals that Oxidative Stress Induces Modulation of the AtfA-Dependent Signaling Networks in Aspergillus nidulans

1Department of Biotechnology and Microbiology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, P.O. Box 63 H-4010, Hungary
2Department of Zoology, Faculty of Sciences, Eszterházy Károly University, Eger, Eszterházy tér 1 H-3300, Hungary
3Department of General and Environmental Microbiology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Pécs, Pécs, P. O. Box 266 H-7601, Hungary
4Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Woosuk University, Wanju 565-701, Republic of Korea
5Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin, 1550 Linden Dr., Madison, WI 53706, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Tamás Emri; uh.bedinu.ecneics@samat.irme

Received 19 December 2016; Revised 17 May 2017; Accepted 13 June 2017; Published 9 July 2017

Academic Editor: Marco Gerdol

Copyright © 2017 Erzsébet Orosz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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