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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7526592, 23 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7526592
Review Article

Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Environmental Toxicants: Epigenetics as an Underlying Mechanism

Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Research, University of Yamanashi, 1110, Shimokato, Chuo, Yamanashi 409-3898, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Kunio Miyake; pj.ca.ihsanamay@ekayimk

Received 21 February 2017; Accepted 2 April 2017; Published 8 May 2017

Academic Editor: Saivageethi Nuthikattu

Copyright © 2017 Nguyen Quoc Vuong Tran and Kunio Miyake This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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