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International Journal of Hepatology
Volume 2012, Article ID 760706, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/760706
Review Article

HIV-Antiretroviral Therapy Induced Liver, Gastrointestinal, and Pancreatic Injury

1Departments of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, and Global Health, University of Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8
2In Vitro Drug Safety and Biotechnology, University of Toronto, MaRS Discovery District, 101 College Street, Suite 300, Lab 351, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1L7
3Alcohol & Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Tygerberg (Cape Town), South Africa
4Department of Psychiatry, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg (Cape Town), South Africa

Received 26 November 2011; Revised 30 December 2011; Accepted 1 January 2012

Academic Editor: Lawrence Cohen

Copyright © 2012 Manuela G. Neuman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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