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International Journal of Hepatology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 958673, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/958673
Review Article

Watch the GAP: Emerging Roles for IQ Motif-Containing GTPase-Activating Proteins IQGAPs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

1Department of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8151, USA
2Division of Hematology, Stony Brook University, HSC T15-053, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8151, USA

Received 11 May 2012; Revised 25 July 2012; Accepted 3 August 2012

Academic Editor: Weiliang Xia

Copyright © 2012 Valentina A. Schmidt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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