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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2010, Article ID 137206, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/137206
Clinical Study

Increased Nitric Oxide and Attenuated Diastolic Blood Pressure Variability in African Americans with Mildly Impaired Renal Function

1Hypertension, Molecular and Applied Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Temple University Health Sciences Campus, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
3Cardiovascular Research Center, School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA

Received 1 September 2010; Revised 9 November 2010; Accepted 19 December 2010

Academic Editor: Roberto Pontremoli

Copyright © 2010 Keith M. Diaz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We investigated the relationship between renal function, blood pressure variability (BPV), and nitric oxide (NO) in a group of African Americans with normal or mildly impaired renal function. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed, NO measured, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated in 38 African Americans. Participants were categorized as having normal (GFR > 90 mL/min per 1.73 m2) or mildly impaired (GFR 60–89 mL/min per 1.73 m2) renal function. Diastolic BPV was significantly lower in the mildly impaired renal function group. Regression analyses revealed a significant positive association between GFR and diastolic BPV for the entire study group. Plasma NO levels were significantly higher in the mildly impaired renal function group and negatively correlated with diastolic BPV. In conclusion, diastolic BPV was reduced in African Americans with mildly impaired renal function, which may be the result of increased NO production. These results conflict with previous findings in diseased and nonblack populations and could provide rationale for studying BPV early in the disease state when BP-buffering mechanisms are still preserved.