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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2011, Article ID 143471, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/143471
Review Article

Role of the Kidneys in Resistant Hypertension

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, PHC F6003, Washington, DC 20007, USA

Received 29 November 2010; Revised 30 December 2010; Accepted 13 January 2011

Academic Editor: Vasilios Papademetriou

Copyright © 2011 Z. Khawaja and C. S. Wilcox. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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