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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 426803, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/426803
Research Article

Depressive Symptoms and 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans: The SABPA Study

1Psychobiology Group, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, UK
2Department of Psychiatry and School of Nursing, McGill University CHUM Research Center, QC, Canada
3Montreal Heart Institute Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7
4Unit for Drug Research and Development, Division of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa
5Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART), School for Physiology, Nutrition, and Consumer Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa

Received 2 June 2011; Revised 3 August 2011; Accepted 17 August 2011

Academic Editor: Tavis S. Campbell

Copyright © 2012 Mark Hamer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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