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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2012, Article ID 658128, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/658128
Research Article

Blood Pressure Reactivity to an Anger Provocation Interview Does Not Predict Incident Cardiovascular Disease Events: The Canadian Nova Scotia Health Survey (NSHS95) Prospective Population Study

1Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
2Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA
3Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3J5

Received 1 August 2011; Revised 7 October 2011; Accepted 26 October 2011

Academic Editor: Joel E. Dimsdale

Copyright © 2012 Jonathan A. Shaffer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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