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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 989345, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/989345
Research Article

Decreased Cognitive/CNS Function in Young Adults at Risk for Hypertension: Effects of Sleep Deprivation

Department of Psychology, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA

Received 27 July 2011; Revised 14 October 2011; Accepted 17 October 2011

Academic Editor: Tavis S. Campbell

Copyright © 2012 James A. McCubbin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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