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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2013, Article ID 523682, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/523682
Clinical Study

Association between Salt Intake and Albuminuria in Normotensive and Hypertensive Individuals

1Cardiology Department, School of medicine, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran
2Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3Hypertension Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4Interventional Cardiology Research Center, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
5Hypertension Research Center, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Received 29 May 2013; Revised 4 August 2013; Accepted 7 August 2013

Academic Editor: Claudio Borghi

Copyright © 2013 Arsalan Khaledifar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. There is a little published data regarding the association between salt intake and albuminuria as an important alarm for progression of cardiovascular and renal dysfunction. We aimed to assess this relationship to emphasize the major role of restricting salt intake to minimize albuminuria and prevent these life-threatening events. Methods. The study population comprised 820 individuals. Participants were assigned to groups as follows: normal albuminuria, slight albuminuria, and clinical albuminuria. Daily salt intake was assessed on the basis of 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, since urinary sodium excretion largely equals sodium intake. Results. In normotensive participants, the mean level of urine albumin was higher in those who had higher amounts of salt intake with a significantly upward trend (the mean urinary albumin level in low-salt-diet group, in medium-salt-intake group, and in high-salt-intake group was , , and , resp., ( )). There was a significant positive correlation between 24-hour urinary sodium secretion and the level of urine albumin (beta = 0.130, ). The amount of salt intake was significantly associated with urine albumin concentration (beta = 3.969, SE = 1.671, ). Conclusion. High salt intake was shown to be associated with higher level of microalbuminuria even adjusted for potential underlying risk factors.