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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2017, Article ID 7247514, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7247514
Research Article

Brain Oscillations Elicited by the Cold Pressor Test: A Putative Index of Untreated Essential Hypertension

1Department of Clinical Therapeutics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece
21st Department of Psychiatry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, “Eginition” Hospital, 115 28 Athens, Greece
3University Mental Health Research Institute (UMHRI), Athens, Greece

Correspondence should be addressed to Christos Papageorgiou; moc.liamg@oigroegapapsirhc

Received 18 December 2016; Accepted 10 April 2017; Published 9 May 2017

Academic Editor: Tomohiro Katsuya

Copyright © 2017 Christos Papageorgiou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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