International Journal of Hypertension

Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Risk


Status
Published

1State University of New York, New York, USA

2NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USA

3Nassau University, New York, USA

4University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands


Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Risk

Description

There is a growing body of evidence to support the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obesity, which are important risk factors contributing to cardiometabolic risk. Moreover, obesity and sleep apnea often coexist in large epidemiological studies. In fact, it is estimated that 60-90% of patients with sleep apnea are obese (defined as BMI > 28 kg/m2) and that a BMI of 28 kg/m2 has a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 74% for sleep apnea. Thus, obesity may be the single most important risk factor in the development of sleep apnea. These cardiometabolic risk factors, coupled with insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, pose a significant danger to health.

In this special issue, we seek to discuss the various mechanisms by which obesity may contribute to the development of sleep apnea among high-risk populations to elucidate effective disease management and treatment in order to provide clinicians, health educators, and policy makers with the most optimal strategies to reduce and prevent cardiovascular and metabolic disease morbidity and mortality.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Race/ethnicity and risk of OSA and cardiometabolic syndrome
  • Management of diabetes and hypertension in OSA population
  • Treatment of OSA and risk reduction of obesity
  • Surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease and obesity
  • Resistant hypertension in patients with OSA and metabolic syndrome: implications for the practicing physician
  • Short sleep duration, obesity, and life satisfaction
  • Linkage of lipid profiles and OSA
  • Obesity, sleep, and race/ethnicity
  • Obesity paradox and sleep duration
  • Epidemic of obesity and sleep apnea as it relates to diabetes and cardiovascular risk
  • Management of OSA, obesity, and psychosocial stressors
  • Short sleep as a predictor of obesity
  • Randomized controlled trials of weight loss to treat obstructive sleep apnea

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 197534
  • - Editorial

Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Risk

Samy I. McFarlane | Olugbenga Ogedegbe | ... | Girardin Jean-Louis
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 205716
  • - Research Article

Factors Associated with Medication Nonadherence among Hypertensives in Ghana and Nigeria

Vincent Boima | Adebowale Dele Ademola | ... | Bamidele O. Tayo
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 801268
  • - Research Article

Low-Glycemic-Index Foods Can Decrease Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in the Short Term

Mina Hosseininasab | Abdolreza Norouzy | ... | Shokoufeh Bonakdaran
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 959256
  • - Research Article

Epidemiology of Hypertension Stages in Two Countries in Sub-Sahara Africa: Factors Associated with Hypertension Stages

Kirubel Zemedkun Gebreselassie | Mojgan Padyab
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 697275
  • - Research Article

Associations of Short Sleep and Shift Work Status with Hypertension among Black and White Americans

Mirnova E. Ceïde | Abhishek Pandey | ... | Girardin Jean-Louis
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 615681
  • - Review Article

Sleep Deficiency and Deprivation Leading to Cardiovascular Disease

Michelle Kohansieh | Amgad N. Makaryus
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 408574
  • - Review Article

Implications of Renal Denervation Therapy in Patients with Sleep Apnea

Fernando Jaén-Águila | José Antonio Vargas-Hitos | Juan Diego Mediavilla-García
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 295916
  • - Research Article

Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

Abiodun M. Adeoye | Adewole Adebiyi | ... | Richard S. Cooper
International Journal of Hypertension
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate36%
Submission to final decision120 days
Acceptance to publication28 days
CiteScore2.100
Impact Factor1.132
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