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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 141068, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/141068
Review Article

Gab Docking Proteins in Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, and Inflammation

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Received 14 May 2012; Accepted 11 December 2012

Academic Editor: Masanori Aikawa

Copyright © 2013 Yoshikazu Nakaoka and Issei Komuro. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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