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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 816283, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/816283
Research Article

The Effects of Insufflation Conditions on Rat Mesothelium

1Research Centre for the Molecular Basis of Disease, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia
2School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
3Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited, 15 Maurice Paykel Road, East Tamaki, Auckland 2013, New Zealand
4Graduate School of Medicine and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia

Received 27 March 2013; Revised 11 June 2013; Accepted 11 June 2013

Academic Editor: G. Rogler

Copyright © 2013 Andrew K. Davey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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