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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 689360, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/689360
Review Article

The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Vascular Inflammation and Remodeling

1Biology Department, College of Engineering, Science, and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA
2NIH RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, College of Engineering, Science, and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Received 16 January 2014; Revised 28 February 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 6 April 2014

Academic Editor: Jean-Marc Cavaillon

Copyright © 2014 Maricica Pacurari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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