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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 970890, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/970890
Review Article

Angiogenesis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Department of Gastroenterology, Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Şişli, 34360 Istanbul, Turkey

Received 29 September 2015; Revised 7 December 2015; Accepted 8 December 2015

Academic Editor: G. Rogler

Copyright © 2015 Canan Alkim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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