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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 3406215, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3406215
Review Article

From Inflammation to Current and Alternative Therapies Involved in Wound Healing

1Physiological Sciences Department, Federal University of Maranhão, São Luís, MA, Brazil
2School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine Department, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Wermerson Assunção Barroso; moc.oohay@osorrabnosremrew

Received 28 March 2017; Revised 1 June 2017; Accepted 6 June 2017; Published 25 July 2017

Academic Editor: B. L. Slomiany

Copyright © 2017 Mariana Barreto Serra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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