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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 5968618, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5968618
Research Article

An In Vitro Model of Gastric Inflammation and Treatment with Cobalamin

Brighton Studies in Tissue-Mimicry and Aided Regeneration (BrightSTAR), Brighton Centre for Regenerative Medicine, School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to A. L. Guildford; ku.ca.nothgirb@drofdliug.l.a

Received 10 January 2017; Revised 26 April 2017; Accepted 7 May 2017; Published 6 June 2017

Academic Editor: Han J. Moshage

Copyright © 2017 T. R. Elliott and A. L. Guildford. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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