Table of Contents
International Journal of Metals
Volume 2015, Article ID 624653, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/624653
Research Article

Microstructure, Strength, and Fracture Topography Relations in AISI 316L Stainless Steel, as Seen through a Fractal Approach and the Hall-Petch Law

1Department of Physical Metallurgy, School of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Central University of Venezuela, Apartado 47514, Los Chaguaramos, Caracas 1041-A, Distrito Capital, Venezuela
2Foundation for Professional Development, The Venezuelan College of Engineering, Caracas 1050, Venezuela
3Failure Analysis Laboratory, School of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Central University of Venezuela, Apartado 47514, Los Chaguaramos, Caracas 1041-A, Distrito Capital, Venezuela

Received 8 May 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015

Academic Editor: Carlos Garcia-Mateo

Copyright © 2015 Oswaldo Antonio Hilders et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The influence of the fracture surface fractal dimension and the fractal dimension of grain microstructure on the strength of AISI 316L type austenitic stainless steel through the Hall-Petch relation has been studied. The change in complexity experimented by the net of grains, as measured by , is translated into the respective fracture surface irregularity through , in such a way that the higher the grain size (lower values) the lower the fracture surface roughness (lower values of ) and the shallower the dimples on the fractured surfaces. The material was heat-treated at 904, 1010, 1095, and 1194°C, in order to develop equiaxed grain microstructures and then fractured by tension at room temperature. The fracture surfaces were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, was determined using the slit-island method, and the values of were taken from the literature. The relation between grain size, , mechanical properties, and , developed for AISI 316L steel, could be generalized and therefore applied to most of the common micrograined metal alloys currently used in many key engineering areas.