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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2009, Article ID 731786, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/731786
Research Article

Studies on the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms Isolated from El-Djerid Salt Lake (Tunisia) under Aerobic Conditions

1Laboratoire Microorganismes et Biomolécules Actives, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis, Tunisia
2Laboratoire de Microbiologie et de Biotechnologie des Environnements Chauds, UMR180, IRD, Universités de Provence et de la Méditerranée, ESIL case 925, 13288 Marseille cedex 9, France

Received 8 April 2009; Accepted 27 August 2009

Academic Editor: Thomas L. Kieft

Copyright © 2009 Abdeljabbar Hedi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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