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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 356981, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/356981
Editorial

Microbial Translocation and Infectious Diseases: What Is the Link?

1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 10 September 2012; Accepted 10 September 2012

Copyright © 2012 Gabriella D'Ettorre et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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