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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 386410, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/386410
Review Article

Development of Class IIa Bacteriocins as Therapeutic Agents

Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G2

Received 17 August 2011; Accepted 8 October 2011

Academic Editor: John Tagg

Copyright © 2012 Christopher T. Lohans and John C. Vederas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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