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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 517529, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/517529
Review Article

Hyphal Growth in Human Fungal Pathogens and Its Role in Virulence

School of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Institute of Medical Sciences, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK

Received 2 August 2011; Accepted 18 August 2011

Academic Editor: Julian R. Naglik

Copyright © 2012 Alexandra Brand. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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