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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 587293, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/587293
Research Article

Evaluations of the Effects of Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Growth and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Technologies, University of L'Aquila, 67100 L'Aquila, Italy

Received 5 December 2011; Accepted 26 January 2012

Academic Editor: Barbara H. Iglewski

Copyright © 2012 B. Segatore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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