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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2013, Article ID 240209, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/240209
Review Article

Novel Regulatory Mechanisms of Pathogenicity and Virulence to Combat MDR in Candida albicans

Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Haryana, Manesar, Gurgaon 122413, India

Received 30 June 2013; Revised 15 August 2013; Accepted 15 August 2013

Academic Editor: Isabel Sá-Correia

Copyright © 2013 Saif Hameed and Zeeshan Fatima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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